Rebuilding the hatch

Now that the Bristol has sold, we can focus our attention on Tipsy Lady.  First order of business is to stop the ingress of water in places that appear to have been leaking for many, many years causing much rot.

The hatch has been disassembled so that it can be rebuilt. The process took four hours, much longer than anticipated.

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There was much prying involved to get the coaming off. This scraper was a casualty.

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Success. Finally.

Once it was home, we did a complete disassembly, milled new frame rails to replace the rotten ones, replaced the plywood core, sanded, and revarnished with seven coats of varnish.

The rot damage was pretty extensive.

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The whole process was much more time consuming than originally anticipated, but the final result was satisfying…

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Unfortunately, finishing this project led us to yet another to add to the list. In re-installing the hatch, we had to remove the rails, which revealed more rot in the cabin top deck core:

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Hatch Project Bottom Line: $367.23

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